Janet's thread

A weblog, mostly about knitting but other topics appear

Random Photos February 29, 2016

Filed under: Photos — Janet @ 8:40 pm

Oxford  from Britain and Ireland in Time       Hamden Plains Cemetery 2IMG

 

A Family Comes To North America

Yes, it was in the 1600’s.  An English family was just one of many to gather their belongings and board a ship bound for North America.  My ancestors.  It gives me a thrill to find named ancestors – my ancestors – part of this wave of people from the British Isles.  Hopes and dreams, in pursuit of religious freedom?  Why did each person come?  Can I put myself in their shoes knowing that I am a direct descendent?

Richard Woodward and Rose Stewart on board the Elizabeth of Ipswich

John Ufford, just a boy coming to the New World

Sir James Miller and Lady Janet Melvin

Judge Samuel Hawley

Captain William French and Mary White

William Jones and Hannah Eaton

Richard Booth

Alce Mousall

Immigrant Ancestor Ship 3-1

 

Book Towns: Part I

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 6:28 pm

Cafe Book Bean

ruedeesperance
A Book Town is a trend that began in the 1960’s and refers to a town or village with a large number of used book or antiquarian book stores.
Along with their unique and plentiful bookstores they also host wonderful literary festivals


These book festivals attract book lovers and bibliophiles from all over the world. A number of towns are also members of the International Organisation of Book Towns.

Check out these first 6 awesome, yet quaint little book towns:

240-Montolieu-village-du-livre-Aude_focus_eventsMontolieu, France
Sometimes referred to as the “Village of Books.” Montolieu was the town that first introduced me to the concept of “Book Towns.” With a population of roughly only 747 people Montolieu contains fifteen bookshops, mostly specializing in second-hand and
16540322265_089531e1a8_zantiquarian books.
Every year the town offers many workshops such as: Used and antiquarian bookshops, Working craftspeople of books and art, The Arts and Crafts of the Book Museum, Bibliophilia…

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In Celebration of Thomas Paine

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 6:19 pm

Interesting Literature

We at Interesting Literature felt it was about time we saluted a truly modern man, Thomas Paine (1737-1809).

A story from the 1960s shows just how inflammatory this champion of freedom, equality, and independence still is, even in more recent times. In 1964 the mayor of Thetford in Norfolk (Paine’s hometown) said he would only approve a statue of Paine if it was stamped with the words ‘convicted traitor’.

Paine

Paine certainly remains a divisive figure, but that is because he was never afraid to speak his mind, even if he knew it would land him in hot water. He played an influential role in both the American War of Independence and the French Revolution. Paine’s pamphlet Common Sense argued for independence for America, and when Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence in 1776, he drew heavily on Paine’s work (Paine was also the first person to use the phrase…

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Five Fascinating Facts about Edmund Burke

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 6:18 pm

Interesting Literature

The life and work of Edmund Burke, told through five great pieces of trivia

1. Burke anticipated the Romantic movement. In his A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1757), Burke introduced the concept of the Sublime, which he defined in opposition to the Beautiful. Whereas the Beautiful is harmonious and aesthetically pleasing, there is something unsettling and dangerous about the Sublime – something potentially destructive. The Sublime, in other words, is both awesome and awful – both terrific and terrifying/terrible. This idea would influence the philosopher Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) but also the Romantic poets: Percy Shelley’s poem about Mont Blanc is often cited as a great example of the Sublime in Romantic poetry. Because the Sublime was wilder and potentially more dangerous, whereas the Beautiful was ordered and controlled, the two terms are said to mark the divide between the Neoclassical poetry…

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Part II: Hettie Schoenthal, An Indomitable Spirit

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 5:13 pm
 

Seattle Now & Then: Seward Street, Juneau, Alaska February 28, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 4:01 pm

DorpatSherrardLomont

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Photographer Frank LaRoche arrived in Seattle a few weeks after its Great Fire of 1889. Through the 1890s he made scores of round-trips to the Klondike, including this visit to the Juneau intersection of Seward Avenue and Front Street. (Museum of History and Industry) THEN: Photographer Frank LaRoche arrived in Seattle a few weeks after its Great Fire of 1889. Through the 1890s he made scores of round-trips to the Klondike, including this visit to the Juneau intersection of Seward Avenue and Front Street. (Museum of History and Industry)

NOW: Through the nearly 120 years that separate this week’s now and then, the Mount Juneau horizon has kept its same recognizable profile. Four-thousand feet up and about seven miles north-northeast rests the Juneau Icefield. It feeds about thirty glaciers, including the Mendenhall, which comes to within a dozen miles of this Juneau intersection. By Seattle analogy, that is roughly the distance between West Point at Discovery Park to Bellevue’s Meydenbauer Bay. NOW: Through the nearly 120 years that separate this week’s now and then, the Mount Juneau horizon has kept its same recognizable profile. Four-thousand feet up and about seven miles north-northeast rests the Juneau Icefield. It feeds about thirty glaciers, including the Mendenhall, which comes to within a dozen miles of this Juneau intersection. By Seattle analogy, that is roughly the distance between West Point at Discovery Park to Bellevue’s Meydenbauer Bay.

Juneau with its namesake mountain above it. By LaRoche (Courtesy of Michael Maslan)Juneau with its namesake mountain above it. By LaRoche (Courtesy of Michael Maslan)

Seward Street is in there somewhere. Seward Street is in there somewhere.

Through our now thirty-four years of “weekly repeating,” the farthest…

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John Ufford Came To America

English Immigrant    John Ufford came to America when he was 6 years old.  He became my 8th Great Grandfather.  He initially landed in Boston in 16

 

James Miller Sr And His Wife Came To America

immigrant ship  James Miller Sr and his wife Lady Janet Melvin came to Virginia in 1637.

They were my 7X Great Grandparents.

 

Richard Brackett – Came To America

immigrant ship  Richard Brackett, born in England, at age 23 he married Alice in London England, came to America with his wife after 1633, settled in Braintree

They were my 8X Great Grandparents

IMG  here is my 11 year old self in North Carolina  in 1948 with my grandmother when she was 86

 my sketch of my sleeping cat