Janet's thread

A weblog, mostly about knitting but other topics appear

Miscellany April 30, 2016

Filed under: Cats,Flowers,Hotels — Janet @ 2:58 am

IMG_0182  Spring flowering tree

IMG_0169  We mrt a friendly cat after my husband had his hair cut

IMG_0171  She was a sweetie

13087765_751017114998642_7825598059881889364_n  but this cat looks menacing – it’s all in the coloring

mt-pleasant_pc_500_72  a grand old New England hotel of a bygone era

 

 

King’s Chapel Boston April 29, 2016

King's Chapel  Burial Ground for my ancestor Col Thomas Dexter Thomas was an early settler who arrived in Lynn Massachusetts in 1630.  He was born in Bristol England in 1594.  He lived to the ripe old age of 82.

 

Willa Cather – Author, Poet

Filed under: Authors,Book Recommendations,Books,Willa Cather — Janet @ 3:01 am

willa cather Willa Cather, 1873-1947

I am currently reading a book of selected letters by this author.  It is a very  thick and fascinating book.  I am enjoying it immensely.   She is of my maternal grandparents generation.  I wonder if they read her books as they were published.  I wonder if my parents did.  I read a few of them years ago and now I want to reread some of them.  If I recall correctly I chose one for my book group in Ireland but it was not a popular choice.  Maybe her books are more for an American audience.  O Pioneers is one of her better known works and reflects her experiences living in Nebraska, her home growing up and her family base for many years.  She is possibly best known as the author of the Middle West.

to be continued

IMG_0179

 

Return to Past Ways April 27, 2016

Filed under: Home Delivery,Horses — Janet @ 6:08 pm

I have joined the ranks of home delivery – groceries and other household items.  And of course there is ordering online and then the postman or a private delivery service leaves the item at your door.  Oh joy.  Years ago my mother had groceries delivered to our home.  The milkman and the iceman came regularly, and the knife sharpener.  And of course the U.S. Postal  Service has a long history going back to the 1800’s.

So my great recent discovery of the present day version of the convenience of home delivery shouldn’t come as such a surprise.

CoalCart&Horse800 coal delivery in Windsor England, years ago

2014_0909_Central_Market_Wagon_lead Lyme New Hampshire, Market wagon

 

My Cat – How She Spent Her Morning April 26, 2016

Filed under: Cats,Katerina — Janet @ 5:45 pm

IMG_0163  Katerina having a nap

 

A Moving Tribute

Filed under: Dogs,Mountaineering,Sherpas — Janet @ 12:45 am

IMG_0156  Sorry about the orientation of this photo

It’s titled Sherpa The Memoir of Ang Tharkay.  He was a very skilled Nepalese sherpa who climbed with some of the greatest mountaineers in the 1920’s-1940’s.  I have read quite a bit about mountaineering and the skill of the Sherpas in their roles assisting the European climbers.  Also I visited Nepal for about 5 weeks in 1965 and since then I have been attuned to anything Nepalese.

There is much to relate about this book – which I enjoyed very much.  But what I want to relate here is the tale of a very faithful dog, named Togo, a Tibetan dog who attached himself to Ang Tharkay and became his bodyguard.  Togo was gentle, affectionate, and faithful.  However he was very large and looked ferocious.

One day as a group of mountaineers were descending from a high camp.  Togo was docilely following down a steep slope covered with a thick layer of snow.  And Tharkay was roped up with 2 other Sherpas when his crampons slipped and he started sliding, pulling the 2 other Sherpas with him.  Togo came to the rescue grabbing Ang Tharkay’s arm and holding on.  The other 2 Sherpas were buried in the snow but Ang T was able to pull them out.  The men proceeded to descend quickly, hearing the rumble of an avalanche.  Alas, the men reached safety, but not poor Togo who was buried at the spot where he had previously saved his master.

1280px-Ten_Prized_Dogs_03                        Bea_Miu_Nan_Šan,_CAC

 

 

St Mary the Virgin Churchyard, Essex, England April 24, 2016

Sir William King  my 11X Great Grandfather is buried here in Essex England

from a Google search

Great Leighs, St Mary the Virgin Churchyard
Also known as: St Mary the Virgin, Great Leighs
Great Leighs, St Mary the Virgin Churchyard
Also known as: St Mary the Virgin, Great Leighs
Info
Map
+ Add to MyCemeteries
Boreham Road
Great Leighs
Chelmsford Borough
Essex England
Postal Code: CM3 1PPSearch Great Leighs, St Mary the Virgin Churchyard:

First Name Last Name

Cemetery notes and/or description:
Great Leighs is a village in Essex, England, half way between Chelmsford and Braintree. In former times it was known as Much Leighes. Great Leighs is the location of the oldest Inn in England, St. Anne’s Castle, situated on the junction of Main Road and Boreham Road. The full history of Saint Anne’s Castle has been lost in the midst of time. However, it is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 and lays claim to be the oldest licensed premises in England, as it served ale to the pilgrims travelling to Thomas Becket’s tomb in the 12th Century. Down in the cellars there are remains of tunnels, which reputedly linked the inn with the nearby Leez Priory, and Great Leighs church. The church has an impressive round tower and is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin. It stands a considerable distance south east from the village.(text by Geoffrey Gillon)

Boreham Road
Great Leighs
Chelmsford Borough
Essex  England
Postal Code: CM3 1PP
Search Great Leighs, St Mary the Virgin Churchyard:
First Name Last Name
Cemetery notes and/or description:
Great Leighs is a village in Essex, England, half way between Chelmsford and Braintree. In former times it was known as Much Leighes. Great Leighs is the location of the oldest Inn in England, St. Anne’s Castle, situated on the junction of Main Road and Boreham Road. The full history of Saint Anne’s Castle has been lost in the midst of time. However, it is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 and lays claim to be the oldest licensed premises in England, as it served ale to the pilgrims travelling to Thomas Becket’s tomb in the 12th Century. Down in the cellars there are remains of tunnels, which reputedly linked the inn with the nearby Leez Priory, and Great Leighs church. The church has an impressive round tower and is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin. It stands a considerable distance south east from the village.(text by Geoffrey Gillon)
 

Seattle Now & Then: The Great White Fleet, 1908

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 2:01 pm

DorpatSherrardLomont

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: About a year after he recorded this fashionable throng on Second Avenue celebrating the visit of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet in the spring of 1908, Frank Nowell became the official photographer for Seattle’s six-month-long Alaska Yukon and Pacific Exhibition in 1909. THEN: About a year after he recorded this fashionable throng on Second Avenue celebrating the visit of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet in the spring of 1908, Frank Nowell became the official photographer for Seattle’s six-month-long Alaska Yukon and Pacific Exhibition in 1909.

NOW: As a guide, Jean Sherrard’s ‘repeat’ includes, on the far right, a glimpse of the Moore Theatre at the southeast corner of Virginia Street and Second Avenue. NOW: As a guide, Jean Sherrard’s ‘repeat’ includes, on the far right, a glimpse of the Moore Theatre at the southeast corner of Virginia Street and Second Avenue.

Perched near, and somehow above, the sidewalk on the east side of Second Avenue, Frank Nowell, the photographer of this flood of fashionable pedestrians, is standing about a half-block north of Stewart Street. The crowd seems to spill onto Second from what the Times called the “immense viewing stand” on its west side.  The pack has gathered to celebrate President Teddy Roosevelt’s ‘Great White Fleet’ during its four-day visit to Seattle.  The American…

View original post 1,005 more words

 

Researching Old Churches

Filed under: Ancestors,Genealogy,Great Fire, London 1666,Old Churches — Janet @ 12:34 am

I had cause to look up St Mary Bothaw, an old church in London, only to discover that it had been destroyed by fire in the Great Fire in London, 1666.  So no nice picture to offer you today.  The marital venue of 2 ancestors in my family tree no longer exists.  I suspect this is an intriguing avenue/sidetrack for further research.

Here is a picture from Wikipedia of the site of the former church.

Side_of_Cannon_St_Station_site_of_St_Mary_Bothaw

 

 

Icons Found April 22, 2016

Filed under: Ancestors,Ancestry,Genealogy — Janet @ 2:59 pm

In researching my genealogy I’ve found some icons and images which I think are rather fun.

medieval knight Medieval Knight

Medieval Lord  Medieval Lord

jane eyre  Charlotte Bronte, illustration for Jane Eyre

Lord William Joseph Ball  Lord William Joseph Ball