Janet's thread

A weblog, mostly about knitting but other topics appear

St Mary the Virgin Churchyard, Essex, England April 24, 2016

Sir William King  my 11X Great Grandfather is buried here in Essex England

from a Google search

Great Leighs, St Mary the Virgin Churchyard
Also known as: St Mary the Virgin, Great Leighs
Great Leighs, St Mary the Virgin Churchyard
Also known as: St Mary the Virgin, Great Leighs
Info
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Boreham Road
Great Leighs
Chelmsford Borough
Essex England
Postal Code: CM3 1PPSearch Great Leighs, St Mary the Virgin Churchyard:

First Name Last Name

Cemetery notes and/or description:
Great Leighs is a village in Essex, England, half way between Chelmsford and Braintree. In former times it was known as Much Leighes. Great Leighs is the location of the oldest Inn in England, St. Anne’s Castle, situated on the junction of Main Road and Boreham Road. The full history of Saint Anne’s Castle has been lost in the midst of time. However, it is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 and lays claim to be the oldest licensed premises in England, as it served ale to the pilgrims travelling to Thomas Becket’s tomb in the 12th Century. Down in the cellars there are remains of tunnels, which reputedly linked the inn with the nearby Leez Priory, and Great Leighs church. The church has an impressive round tower and is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin. It stands a considerable distance south east from the village.(text by Geoffrey Gillon)

Boreham Road
Great Leighs
Chelmsford Borough
Essex  England
Postal Code: CM3 1PP
Search Great Leighs, St Mary the Virgin Churchyard:
First Name Last Name
Cemetery notes and/or description:
Great Leighs is a village in Essex, England, half way between Chelmsford and Braintree. In former times it was known as Much Leighes. Great Leighs is the location of the oldest Inn in England, St. Anne’s Castle, situated on the junction of Main Road and Boreham Road. The full history of Saint Anne’s Castle has been lost in the midst of time. However, it is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 and lays claim to be the oldest licensed premises in England, as it served ale to the pilgrims travelling to Thomas Becket’s tomb in the 12th Century. Down in the cellars there are remains of tunnels, which reputedly linked the inn with the nearby Leez Priory, and Great Leighs church. The church has an impressive round tower and is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin. It stands a considerable distance south east from the village.(text by Geoffrey Gillon)
 

Seattle Now & Then: The Great White Fleet, 1908

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 2:01 pm

DorpatSherrardLomont

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: About a year after he recorded this fashionable throng on Second Avenue celebrating the visit of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet in the spring of 1908, Frank Nowell became the official photographer for Seattle’s six-month-long Alaska Yukon and Pacific Exhibition in 1909. THEN: About a year after he recorded this fashionable throng on Second Avenue celebrating the visit of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet in the spring of 1908, Frank Nowell became the official photographer for Seattle’s six-month-long Alaska Yukon and Pacific Exhibition in 1909.

NOW: As a guide, Jean Sherrard’s ‘repeat’ includes, on the far right, a glimpse of the Moore Theatre at the southeast corner of Virginia Street and Second Avenue. NOW: As a guide, Jean Sherrard’s ‘repeat’ includes, on the far right, a glimpse of the Moore Theatre at the southeast corner of Virginia Street and Second Avenue.

Perched near, and somehow above, the sidewalk on the east side of Second Avenue, Frank Nowell, the photographer of this flood of fashionable pedestrians, is standing about a half-block north of Stewart Street. The crowd seems to spill onto Second from what the Times called the “immense viewing stand” on its west side.  The pack has gathered to celebrate President Teddy Roosevelt’s ‘Great White Fleet’ during its four-day visit to Seattle.  The American…

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Researching Old Churches

Filed under: Ancestors,Genealogy,Great Fire, London 1666,Old Churches — Janet @ 12:34 am

I had cause to look up St Mary Bothaw, an old church in London, only to discover that it had been destroyed by fire in the Great Fire in London, 1666.  So no nice picture to offer you today.  The marital venue of 2 ancestors in my family tree no longer exists.  I suspect this is an intriguing avenue/sidetrack for further research.

Here is a picture from Wikipedia of the site of the former church.

Side_of_Cannon_St_Station_site_of_St_Mary_Bothaw