Janet's thread

A weblog, mostly about knitting but other topics appear

From Glastonbury again October 26, 2016

Filed under: Genealogy,Glastonbury Conn — Janet @ 7:47 pm

Here I am back in New England again after less than a month  not for a high school reunion but for a sort of family reunion with  2 out of our 3 sons and their wives and children.  Glorious sunny days here and lots of laughter and fun.  A trip to L L Bean of course and Barnes and Noble and the local yarn store.  And an afternoon at a Corn Maize.  Good food and drink.  I managed to get to the Glastonbury Historical Society Museum and searched superficially for any familiar names.  I know from  my genealogy research that my ancestors were among the early settlers all along the Connecticut River Valley.  Research continues.

Young-Scheveningen-Woman-KnittingloomandwheelCemetery for those who died at Gurs By Jean Michel Etchecolonea (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia CommonsFirst Day of School 2014    London Grandchildren

 

Reading

Filed under: Books,Comanche Indians — Janet @ 7:31 pm

Colonial Paul Wentworth House      This colonial woman is either knitting or sewing at the Wentworth House in Portsmouth New Hampshire.

I am knitting and reading a book about the Comanche Indians in the western part of the United States.  The particular emphasis is on Texas.  Empire of the Summer Moon is the title of the book.  First published in 2010.  And an endorsement of being a New York Times Best Seller.  I must say it is quite compelling reading.

 

Falling Leaves

Filed under: Books,Burial Grounds,Connecticut,Halloween,Late autumn,Seasons — Janet @ 6:01 pm
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not exactly the picture I wanted but it will have to do to convey the feeling of late autumn here in Glastonbury Connecticut.  A lovely late Fall day, clear and cold.  A slight breeze and more leaves come down.

But I have a cold and am staying inside just reading a book and knitting.  Cozy.

 

Bhutan In The Headlines October 21, 2016

Filed under: Bhutan,Family history,Family memories,Nepal,Refugees — Janet @ 4:58 pm

It’s not often that you see a headline story about the tiny country of Bhutan, but such was the case when I picked up the Seattle Times a few days ago.  In a way it was a heartwarming story – but also a sad one.  The Nepalese are/were a minority community in this Himalayan Kingdom.  But during the years we were there in the late 1980’s there were rumblings of expelling the Nepalese, even though they had been there for generations.

The headline story in the Seattle Times made this very personal.  Here was a Nepalese/Bhutanese family – the family members had been separated for many years.  They were among the more than 100,000 ethic Nepalis who were expelled from Bhutan in the early 1990’s (this was just after we left).  In 1992, 15 members of the Biswas family fled their home in southern Bhutan in the back of a truck.  They had sold their livestock and the land they had farmed for generations. They crossed India and found safety in a refugee camp in eastern Nepal.

Starting in 2009 waves of the family were resettled in Tukwila in South King County Seattle.  The headline and feature article featured the last of the family to arrive here in Seattle from the refugee camp.  A happy ending to a sad story.

For more details and pictures see the Seattle Times, October 17, 2016

I hope there is a happy ending for our many Nepalese friends we knew in Bhutan.

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In The Mercantile Trade October 20, 2016

matthew-beckwith    A description of my 8th Great Grandfather Matthew Beckwith, a man of means.  The term planter meant

 

A Book To Make You Think

img_1508  I certainly recommend this book – Resurrection Science, Conservation, De-Extinction and the Future of Wild Things, by M. R. O’Connor.  The author gives 8 case studies in which she raises various scientific, economic, ethical, and philosophical points.  And it’s quite comprehensible for a non-scientific person.

 

A Short Analysis of Seamus Heaney’s ‘Digging’ October 19, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 6:04 pm

Interesting Literature

A critical reading of a classic Heaney poem

‘Digging’ appeared in Seamus Heaney’s first collection, Death of a Naturalist, in 1966. Like a number of the sonnets by Tony Harrison – who was born two years before Heaney – ‘Digging’ is about a poet-son’s relationship with his father and the sense that the working-class son, by choosing the vocation of the poet (but then who chooses it? It chooses them, we might say), is adopting a path very different from his father’s, and his father’s before him. You can read ‘Digging’ here; in this post we offer our analysis of the poem’s meaning, language, and effects.

In summary, ‘Digging’ sees Heaney reflecting on his father, who used to dig potato drills (shallow furrows in fields, into which the potato seeds can be planted) but now struggles to dig flowerbeds in his garden. The poet’s grandfather, he recollects, used…

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Writing Class

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 3:06 pm

Deja vue

Janet's thread

A few years ago I did an adult education course in writing. It was a very interesting class. We had all sorts of assignments and we had to read out our compositions. It was rather daunting at first and I felt quite shy and self-conscious about it. On the other hand it was very entertaining to hear the others in the class. One learned a lot about each of the 15 or so contributors. I enjoyed the class very much – it was so sociable and also we received good criticism and tips for improving our writing.

Our teacher was primarily interested in poetry, being a poet herself with several published works. I felt she wanted to turn each of us into poets but still we were allowed to go our own way, up to a point. I was particularly keen to work on my autobiography but she put me…

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More Information For The Family Tree

Filed under: Ancestors,Genealogy — Janet @ 2:40 pm

I keep finding more ancestors to add to the family tree.  The research just keeps bearing  fruit.  The total number is now 3942.

plantagenants                English Immigrant                    arbella-flagship-of-the-winthrop-fleet                      Immigrant Ship lyon               arabella                               photo[1]

 

All Things Nantucket

Filed under: Ancestors,Genealogy,Nantucket Island,Nathaniel Philbrick — Janet @ 3:49 am

Living on the NW Corner of the West Coast I do not meet many people with whom I can share my love of Nantucket Island which is so well known and loved by East Coast people.  The magical island of Nantucket, 30 miles off the coast of Cape Cod, is the site of many happy memories, not only for me but for other members of my family and friends.  I first visited the island when I was 10 years old.  One of my older sisters had a summer job there as a waitress.  That was the first of many memorable visits.  Both of my older sisters met their future husband there.  A family friend had a large house in Siasconset in a more remote part of the island – my mother and I were house guests for a few weeks during several summers. The family of a college friend rented a house in Wauwinet for many years.  College friends were invited to join them.  Summer in Nantucket – magical.

Visits to the Island have been infrequent in subsequent years but I continue to read about  Nantucket and its fascinating history.  I’m particularly intrigued by its whaling history.

I have learned a lot from the writings of Nathaniel Philbrick.  And I have read Herman Melville’s classic Moby Dick twice.  Several prominent names in Nantucket’s history are Macy, Starbuck, and Coffin.  I am thrilled that I have found  a number of ancestors named Coffin – and they resided on Nantucket!  More information will be forthcoming in due course.

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