Janet's thread

A weblog, mostly about knitting but other topics appear

Heat Wave July 31, 2017

Filed under: Cats,Katerina,Seasons,Summer — Janet @ 9:15 pm

IMG_3968  beating the heat – Katerina finds a shady spot

 

Old Church – Fenny Compton Wiltshire

Filed under: Churches,Great Migration Study,Old Churches,Postcards — Janet @ 3:30 pm

Old Church Fenny Compton  Church of St Peter and  St Clare, Fenny Compton, Wiltshire, England.  This church dates back to 1320.

The church of my 9th Great Grandfather, Luke Hitchcock.  Luke was born in Fenny Compton in 1614.  He emigrated to America and ended his days in 1659 in Wethersfield Connecticut.  Part of the Great Migration.

 

 

Beauty In Weathered Gravestones July 29, 2017

Zachariah Walker  Gravestone for Zechariah Walker, South Cemetery, Woodbury, Lichfield County, Connecticut

Zechariah Walker was my 8th Great Grandfather.  He was born in Boston in 1637, died in 1699, in Woodbury Connecticut at age 63.

His parents were born in England and married in Boston in 1635.  His mother came to America in 1630.  She lived first in Salem.  I haven’t been able to determine when his father immigrated to America.

I like the way this gravestone has weathered – beautiful.

 

Back To Greens And Yellows

IMG_3956  Shades of green and yellow – Knitted Hat 12

 

Wood Art

Filed under: Art,Art works,Cats,Dogs — Janet @ 5:02 pm

Wood Art Pug and Cat

Handsome Duo – PugandCat     Two of my favorite Facebook characters

 

Nice Sketch

Filed under: Artists,Colonial History,Marblehead,Revolutionary War — Janet @ 2:34 pm
This was Sir Charles Henry Frankland, His Majesty’s Collector of the Port of Boston and, next to his friend, Governor Shirley, he was the most prominent personage in the Mass Bay Colony. This refined and well-bred aristocrat had come to Marblehead to oversee the establishment of coastal defenses at nearby Fort Sewall, and to look into the smuggling that had been carried on boldly. He would See More
 Sir Charles Henry Frankland
 

Seattle Now & Then: ‘The City is More Than Human’ July 27, 2017

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 9:53 pm

DorpatSherrardLomont

(click to enlarge photos)

THEN: Ballard dairy farmer Jess Jensen poses with four of his milch cows on 8th Avenue Northwest, near its intersection with NW 58th Street. The subject looks north.

NOW: Holding his book “The City Is More Than Human,” historian Frederick L. Brown, poses for Jean Sherrard in the traffic on 8th Avenue NW. Brown only seems to be in danger. The cars behind him have been stopped by the traffic light at NW 58th Street.

Here stands historian Fred Brown holding his new book and farmer Jess Jensen holding the roped reins attached to his four cows. The two-legged animals pose near one another and the intersection of NW 58th Street and 8th Avenue NW, although across about a century of time.  Before Ballard’s 1907 annexation into Seattle, 58th was named Times Street (not knowing other or better, I propose that it was…

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