Janet's thread

A weblog, mostly about knitting but other topics appear

Margaret Drabble May 4, 2018

Filed under: Authors,Book Collections,Book covers,Books,Margaret Drabble — Janet @ 3:19 pm

I am currently reading books written by an author from the past – that is author Margaret Drabble.  She was particularly popular in the ’80’s but is still writing today.  My current book is The Radiant Way, written in 1987.  My copy is a discard from the library in La Connor, purchased in the Library Thrift Shop in La Connor.  This Thrift Shop is a great place for finding books you wished you had read but somehow passed you by.  Or maybe you read it so long ago you have forgotten all about it.  The prices are right and you are supporting a good cause.

IMG_1567     a-very-young-margaret-drabble  a very young Margaret Drabble

Looking back at previous blog posts, I find I wrote about her and her writing in 2010.  A post titled Reading Margaret Drabble.  Most interesting.

 

 

 

 

Book Illustrations February 22, 2018

Filed under: Art works,Book covers — Janet @ 7:52 pm

28336655_10214540023589612_6338929805233291968_o  I couldn’t resist sharing this splendid book cover for a book published in the late 19th century by L. Prang & Co.

 

 

Reading Treasures February 5, 2018

Filed under: Book covers,Book Recommendations,Books,Illustrations,Reading — Janet @ 12:08 am

IMG_5128       IMG_5129     Apologies for the orientation of these 2 photos,  What a splendid book by the Norwegian writer Karl Ove Knausgaard – Winter.  His book Autumn came out a while ago, now Winter, and I’m sure Spring and Summer are sure to follow.  Just collections of kind of random essays appropriate to the season.  Excellent – and thought provoking.  Plus beautiful paintings.

 

Binge Reading April 24, 2017

IMG_3020   Alexander Hamilton – yes I finished it.  A bit slow at times ……but the concluding chapters made it all worth reading.  Now I want the music!

 

Good Reading November 1, 2016

Filed under: Authors,Book covers,Books,Native Indian Tribes,Reading — Janet @ 4:36 pm

empire-summer-moon     This is one of the books I read while I was in Glastonbury Connecticut last week.  A lucky find on my son’s bookshelf.  It made for grim but gripping reading.  And it was sad too.  We whites were the immigrants pushing aside the Native Indian peoples.

 

Reading Surprise April 22, 2015

Filed under: Authors,Book covers,Book Reviews,Books — Janet @ 5:31 am

stephen king 003   Joyland by Stephen King.  A good author but going by the cover I had my doubts about this one.  Much to my surprise it turned out to be a potboiler or a cheap thriller/horror.  It was a very GOOD READ.   I liked it a lot.  And it’s small size made it easy to carry about.  A good one to have for airplane travel.  I’m still an old fashioned reader of paper copies.

 

A Bit of Knitting August 15, 2011

Filed under: Book covers,Books,Knitting,Socks — Janet @ 5:17 pm

Nothing like thinking and writing about my ideas for doing a rug (see previous posts) to make me pick up the knitting needles again.  At last I’m getting around to knitting a pair of socks that I was supposed to knit some time ago – I won’t say how long.  Two balls of Mini Mochi Crystal Palace Yarn (80% merino wool, 20% nylon) have been sitting in my knitting basket for several months.  My knitting basket is actually a Janet Basket ,yes, that really is the trade name of my basket, a present from my brother-in-law in Canada.

 the yarn and the first sock, 7 inch bamboo needles no. 6 (4.0 mm).  The needles were purchased in Victoria when I went to that nice yarn store,  the Button and Needlework Boutique, and couldn’t resist buying a skein of green yarn and of course had to buy needles to use when I got back to the hotel, etc. etc.  I didn’t get around to the knitting on that trip but I’m now glad to have the needles for knitting the socks.  The yarn and needles are a joyful combination.

Add to the knitting a good book –  Henning Mankell’s latest Kurt Wallander  novel.

 

 

 

Curious Philatelic Activities June 26, 2011

  a curious book about an eccentric Englishman who enjoyed challenging the postal system

  if you can read the fine print on the back cover of this book, you can find out a bit more about this man W. Reginald Bray (1879-1939).  He really was eccentric.

My philatelic activities are a bit more mundane.  Here are several postcards I found recently.

  I don’t know what breed of dog this is.  For some reason I have a feeling it’s Belgian.  The seller of the card thinks the card dates from 1907 but there is no message or stamp to give any more clues.  It will go  into the album with my other dog postcards.

  “The Return of the Oyster Fishers”, original painting by Francois Nicolas Augustin Feyen-Perrin (1829-1888).  According to the inscription of the card, the painting hangs in the Luxumbourg Gallery in Paris.  Again no message or stamp on the back to give any further clues.

  this is a card of the Conservatory of Music at Oberlin College in Oberlin Ohio.  I bought this card (for the princely sum of 50 cents) with Oberlin friends in  mind, but they are not postcard collectors so I am quite happy to keep it.  I think that building is just magnificent.

 

The Cape Ann June 24, 2011

Filed under: Art works,Artists,Authors,Book covers,Books,Georgia O'Keeffe — Janet @ 12:23 am

       Here is a lovely book that I found 2nd hand here in Seattle.  Copyright 1988, published in this Penguin edition in 1989.  I was attracted by the cover – an Edward Hopper painting, Hodgkin’s House, Cape Ann, Massachusetts.  I thought the story would be set in New England.  That is not the case…..no, the setting is the Northern Midwest near the end of the Great Depression.  The narrator is 6 years old.  Her mother has a dream of owning her own home – she and her daughter have identified the Cape Ann house in a house catalog.  Their plans keep getting thwarted.  It is a wonderful story and I could hardly put it down.  I didn’t want to let it go.

A while ago I wrote a blog about Edward Hopper.

Now I’m in the mood to read about another artist.     So this is the book I have selected from my shelf of unreads.  Again a book I found 2nd hand here in Seattle.  Georgia O’Keeffee lived a long life, 1887-1986.  Her life touched 3 generations – my grandparents, my parents, and my generation.  I don’t really know much about her, just that she is a famous artist, and her work is widely known.   

The Hurtigruten ship I wrote about has completed its epic journey.  But Wimbledon is now in progress.  What bliss to alternate between watching/listening to Wimbledon matches and reading this book.  Would that life could be so simple.

On the subject of books, I’m trying to reconstruct in my memory a list of titles I read as a teenager or maybe preteen.  I’ve got as far as Armstrong Sperry and his books All Sails Set and Call It Courage and Wagons Westward.   There were other books about the whalers and the pioneers by other authors.   

Eventually I discovered Willa Cather, Sinclair Lewis, Ernest Hemingway.  Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea was published in magazine form and I remember reclining out in the backyard being engrossed in reading that.  The list will grow.

 

17 Swedish Designers June 4, 2011

   17 Swedish Designers, all women, touring in the U.S.   This is an exhibition of current industrial design ideas as pursued by 17 Swedish women.  Ceramics, furniture, and textiles, design for everyday use.  In black and white with a lot of bright accents.  This morning I went to a the Nordic Heritage Museum to see the exhibition and hear a talk given by one of the designers, Lotta Kuhlhorn.  Lotta is a graphic designer.  She has quite a range of work, all of which I liked – book covers, designs for kitchenware, designs for textiles.  She has her own firm,  Koloni Stockholm, along with being a designer for IKEA.  Her work, and that of others in the show, made me think of William Morris, Marimekko, and Cath Kidston.  She really likes the styles from the 1960’s – and that made many in the audience feel right at home!  I liked the colourful dress she was wearing – when asked if she had designed it, she replied “no, I found it in a flea market in Stockholm only last week”.  That is just so neat – to be a distinguished visitor giving a talk about a major exhibition and wearing a dress she found in a flea market.  My type of person!!

Here’s another website I found showing some of her work.  I think it’s fabulous. 

The exhibition was spread out over 3 rooms in the museum.  Items very neatly displayed on temporary flooring/platforms.  I was a bit disappointed not to see more in the way of textiles but then that’s my particular interest.  The exhibition as a whole was wonderful.   And here are a few of my photos from this morning.

  these knitted textiles were the work of Ulrika Martensson.

  very strong but in a way muted statements in rugs and cushions

  this photo doesn’t do justice to Lotta Kuhlhorn’s work but I want to include it anyhow

  an IKEA chair and cushion – I am a great fan of IKEA and in fact the chair I am sitting on as I type this is an IKEA chair which I bought for the sheer love of the design.

  some of the people there this morning – you can’t quite see Lotta live but she is in the mural – 2nd from the right

  Lotta live, in the patterned dress with a beige sweater – in the discussion earlier one of the questions was about a favourite colour – Lotta wasn’t sure but did say that one technique she used for getting to like a colour was to wear it for a while.  So here she is wearing beige which she doesn’t like very much but has plans to use it.  I really like her approach!

Another humourous thing that happened this morning was early on in the slide show when Lotta was starting to talk about her work.  She showed a couple of slides of her allotment in Stockholm.  Allotment was a strange word to this Seattle audience.  It was finally sorted out that allotments here in Seattle are called “pea patches”.  I like allotment better.

It was a coincidence this morning that I had a couple of emails about a big exhibition that is opening tomorrow in Kilkenny in Ireland.  An exhibition of work by leading tapestry weavers – all old friends.  Wish I could be there.