Janet's thread

A weblog, mostly about knitting but other topics appear

My Grandmother Mary Elizabeth Murdock, Another Snippet April 11, 2017

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In 1882 at age 19 my grandmother married Major Charles Dana Miller.  There was a big difference in their ages.  At 46 he was old enough to be her father.  They went on to have 5 children – Myrtle in 1884, Ruth in 1886, Dana in 1887, Joseph in 1891, and Roy in 1893.  Major Miller, though in ill health as a result of injuries incurred in the Civil War, was an active member in their local community of Mt. Vernon Ohio.  For health reasons, they spent a certain amount of time in Florida.  Was this an asthmatic condition?  But it was in Mt. Vernon where he died at the still young age of 61 in 1898.  Mary became a widow with 5 young children.

I recall being told that he had an encounter with a burglar in the cellar of their home in Mt. Vernon.  Gun shots were exchanged and a bullet shattered a glass jar used to preserve fruits and vegetables.  He was cut by a piece of glass, blood poisoning developed, proving to be fatal.  That’s the story in my memory.

Alternatively I have subsequently read that his death was due to skin cancer.  Quite different.  That is the cause of death given in the book about his service in the Civil War – Struggle for the Life of the Republic.

Reading the obituary published following his death, the writer indicates that Charles was a man of small stature/light frame and nervous temperament.  This implies that he was not 100% healthy at the time of his enlistment in 1861, at age 25.  Despite this he served valiantly until his honorable discharge in 1964.  Over the years  he went on to father 7 children.  In later life he spent time in Florida, for health reasons.  Near the end he returned to Newark and failed  more rapidly.     I think this sounds like cancer.  Or possibly his problems with asthma and chronic bronchitis just lead to an early death.

Questions – family mysteries.

 

My Grandmother Was Right September 16, 2016

Filed under: Ancestors,Ancestry,Family history,Genealogy,Grandma Miller — Janet @ 8:14 pm

Long before the days of the internet and Ancestry.com, my grandmother, Elizabeth Murdock Miller, compiled genealogical record books and charts/arcs for her paternal and maternal ancestors.  What a treasure trove of information she assembled.  I wonder how she did it.  Those were kept in the glass door bookcase in our living room in my childhood home.  Many is the hour I spent looking at these books.  And now here I am after months and years of compiling information from Ancestry.com and other internet resources and I am even now finding more information that matches what my grandmother found almost 100 years ago.

My latest find is the following from Geni.com:

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From The Vermont Historical Magazine Dummerston, p. 45

“The Millers of Scotland were of Saxon origin and followed the leadership of Edward and founded Edinburgh, A.D. 449.  The history of the family is rather obscure until about the tear 1800 when the country was distracted by civil war, assuming a religious character between Protestantism and Catholicism.  The Millers sided with the Protestants, and later with the Presbyterians or Covenanters, when persecuted by James the First, in his efforts to establish Episcopacy.  The laws against Presbyterianism were so arbitrary that it lead to great disorder and opposition by the inhabitance, and many personal encounters passed between the liberty-loving Scots and the minions of the king, in the enforcement of obnoxious laws.  The name of James Miller is found twice recorded in a list of those who paid fines for transgressing the laws in the city of Edinburgh, …… [for account see VHM, p. 45].

The oppression of the Covenanters led many to seek the shores of America where they could worship God without restraint.  “Senior” Miller and his son, James, emigrated from Edinburgh about 1660.

(The above references a Miller family that emigrated to New England, not Virginia)”

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Now after quoting the above, I wish to point out that my grandmother’s records show a Sen Miller arriving in Charlestown in 1660.  At last, here’s an ancestor identified by my grandmother and not found until today on an ancestry internet research site. Point One

Point Two – I am also under the impression that the Edinburgh Millers came to Edinburgh from the Isle of Sky.  I found that somewhere long ago when I was looking through my grandmother’s work but so far I haven’t been able to verify that bit if information.

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My Uncle Dana January 24, 2016

Filed under: Ancestry,Cemeteries,Genealogy,Grandma Miller — Janet @ 3:53 pm

dana m miller grave marker  Dana Murdock Miller 1887-1913 Cedar Hill Cemetery Newark Ohio

Dana was my father’s older brother.  He was 4 years older, not a big gap.  What puzzles me is that there is so little information  about him.  I understand that he was very popular, and outgoing.  He was an actor.  He died in Chicago in a fire on September 27 1913 at the age of 26.  That is the impression I have but if that is so, why the mystery?  Did he die in a fire? Or was there some other cause of death?

In the introduction to her  book of poetry self-published by my grandmother when she was in her 80’s and a member of a poetry circle in Daytona Beach Florida, she writes that she raised 4 children.  Clearly she raised 5 children.  She was 50 years old when Dana died.

Unfortunately both my sister and I have misplaced her little book of poetry to re-examine the  introduction and the poems more closely to see if there any clues to explain this.

 

My Grandfather’s Obituary January 10, 2016

Filed under: Ancestors,Genealogy,Grandfathers,Grandma Miller,Grandparents — Janet @ 3:59 am

A long obituary for my father’s father – July 1898, Newark Daily Advocate

Major Charles Dana Miller

Civil War Veteran

I can’t upload this obituary at the moment – technical problems.  Tech support is coming tomorrow watch the big football game.  Seattle Seahawks v Minnesota Vikings.  Go Seahawks!  Brr.

Charles Dana Miller Cedar Hill Cemetery turn this photo 90 degrees to the right

 

My Maternal Great Grandfather

Filed under: Ancestors,Genealogy,Grandma Miller,Murdock Family Members — Janet @ 1:30 am

 

 

Joseph Buckingham Murdock  1834- 1916

Joseph B Murdock  Oct 7 1916              Joseph B Murdock 2nd photo

Brick Church Cemetery, Crown Point New York

 

Crown Point New York July 28, 2015

Filed under: Ancestors,Genealogy,Grandma Miller — Janet @ 6:20 pm

My Grandmother Miller was born and raised in Crown Pt.  Our ancestors were early settlers there.

Here is an extract from the lighthouse web site.

  • Samuel Murdock sold the land that the lighthouse sits on to the United States government in 1856 for the purpose of constructing a lighthouse there. Murdock owned the lands that Fort St. Frederic and Fort Crown Point (Amherst) sit on today. He protected the forts during his lifetime and as a result the forts, though old and crumbling are still partially intact and available to public viewing. Murdock and his wife Laura signed the title to the lighthouse property over to the U.S. government on November 24, 1856. Records to this effect exist in the National Archives today. Samuel Murdock was lighthouse keeper during the time that James Raine was serving with the US Cavalry during the United States Civil War. When James Raine returned from the Civil War, Murdock gave up the commission to Raine. Samuel Murdock and his wife Laura are buried in Crown Point.
 

Samuel Foote Murdock (1st) spent his entire life on the soil where he was born, but this limited geographical horizon produced neither a plodder nor a bigot. He read considerably, especially in his latter years, was always well informed on current events and acquired wealth of knowledge not identified with his vocation as a farmer. he had a kindly, genial dispostion and his clear, untroubled eyes bespke a man of wisdom and good-will. He was a medium or even less than medium height, and more than average weight without being corpulent. His appearance was widely different from his older brother Jim, who was taller and more angular. In disposition, they were also unalike. The two, however fared well as partners and with their father’s guidance soon doubled the property he had acquired and farmed it all more intensely.
The congenial nature and kindly wisdom of Samuel Foote (1st) was due in some part no doubt to this period and to the circumstances of his life. Up to the last two decades of his life, economice conditions in general had been favorable to farming and in the middle life he profited by the boom prices of the Civil War when, as an example, we and his brother recieved $1.00 a pound for the wool from their flock of 2000 sheep. With his brother, Jim he recieved a large productive sure-crop farm plant from his father, and up to the age of 45 had his father at his side for advice and aid.
On a site one mile south from the old forts and some hundred yards eastward from the highway, he purchased a rambling, one and a half story farm house in the early New England style. This location was a short quarter mile northward from his father’s home, also occupied by his brother, Jim, following the burning of Judge Murdock’s stone house a mile to the southward. In this new home he lived out his life.
When his two sons and the two eldest sons of his brother, Jim, reached maturity, they were each given a farm of about two hundred and fifty acres, cut from the acreage accumulated by Judge Murdock and extended by his sons. Sometime prior to this, the sites of the old Forts. St. Frederick and Crown Point with some two hundred adjacent acres had been sold and Samuel Foote Murdock (1st) retained several hundred acres until his death.
Samuel Foote Murdock (1st) was during his entire life an active member and usually on the Board of the First Congregational Church of Crown Point.
” He had what must have been even in that time and place, a remarkable turnout, a closed carriage – a coach – with box for the drivers  and with an interior upholestered in white brocade. ( I saw this old coach some 30 years ago (from date of 1939), then rather the worse for wear.)”

maryparrack

maryparrack originally shared this

07 May 2014story      

Samuel Foote Murdock (1st) spent his entire life on the soil where he was born, but this limited geographical horizon produced neither a plodder nor a bigot. He read considerably, especially in his latter years, was always well informed on current events and acquired wealth of knowledge not identified with his vocation as a farmer. he had a kindly, genial dispostion and his clear, untroubled eyes bespke a man of wisdom and good-will. He was a medium or even less than medium height, and more than average weight without being corpulent. His appearance was widely different from his older brother Jim, who was taller and more angular. In disposition, they were also unalike. The two, however fared well as partners and with their father’s guidance soon doubled the property he had acquired and farmed it all more intensely.
The congenial nature and kindly wisdom of Samuel Foote (1st) was due in some part no doubt to this period and to the circumstances of his life. Up to the last two decades of his life, economice conditions in general had been favorable to farming and in the middle life he profited by the boom prices of the Civil War when, as an example, we and his brother recieved $1.00 a pound for the wool from their flock of 2000 sheep. With his brother, Jim he recieved a large productive sure-crop farm plant from his father, and up to the age of 45 had his father at his side for advice and aid.
On a site one mile south from the old forts and some hundred yards eastward from the highway, he purchased a rambling, one and a half story farm house in the early New England style. This location was a short quarter mile northward from his father’s home, also occupied by his brother, Jim, following the burning of Judge Murdock’s stone house a mile to the southward. In this new home he lived out his life.
When his two sons and the two eldest sons of his brother, Jim, reached maturity, they were each given a farm of about two hundred and fifty acres, cut from the acreage accumulated by Judge Murdock and extended by his sons. Sometime prior to this, the sites of the old Forts. St. Frederick and Crown Point with some two hundred adjacent acres had been sold and Samuel Foote Murdock (1st) retained several hundred acres until his death.
Samuel Foote Murdock (1st) was during his entire life an active member and usually on the Board of the First Congregational Church of Crown Point.
” He had what must have been even in that time and place, a remarkable turnout, a closed carriage – a coach – with box for the drivers  and with an interior upholestered in white brocade. ( I saw this old coach some 30 years ago (from date of 1939), then rather the worse for wear.)”

maryparrack

maryparrack originally shared this

07 May 2014story