Janet’s thread

A weblog, mostly about knitting but other topics appear

Old Church – Fenny Compton Wiltshire July 31, 2017

Filed under: Churches,Great Migration Study,Old Churches,Postcards — Janet @ 3:30 pm

Old Church Fenny Compton  Church of St Peter and  St Clare, Fenny Compton, Wiltshire, England.  This church dates back to 1320.

The church of my 9th Great Grandfather, Luke Hitchcock.  Luke was born in Fenny Compton in 1614.  He emigrated to America and ended his days in 1659 in Wethersfield Connecticut.  Part of the Great Migration.

 

 

A Work In Progress June 20, 2017

Immigrant ship 33   Immigrant Ship

 

From the piles of papers I’ve accumulated in my genealogy research I am now compiling a list of my immigrant ancestors who came to America – who, when, what year, etc.

Following is my draft so far:   Sorry, I’m having trouble copying the Word document

 

 

Ancestor Count Milestones June 2, 2017

My latest statistic – five thousand seven hundred, 5700, ancestors on my family tree and still counting on June 2 2017.

I keep finding more ancestors to add to my tree.  Ancestry.com keeps growing and various other genealogy resources are being revealed.  The digital age!

More specifically I’m trying to be sure I have identified all the ancestors who emigrated to North America.  But this work results in pursuing many other ancestors and their stories as well.  The pursuit of knowledge!

IMG_3115  A gold mine of information

 

IMG_3295  4 more books I might acquire – when I was visiting the East Coast last week, my cousin and I shared some of our research and these books are part of her library.  She is deep into genealogy research and far more trained than I am.  She volunteers at the New England Genealogical Research Institute once a week.  We spent a bit of time exchanging and sharing information but other activities intervened and called upon our time.  A return visit when we might have more time to focus on our shared genealogy interests is called for – maybe a visit to the Saugus Ironworks and the Peabody Essex Museum.

 

William Tuttle – My 9X Great Grandfather May 14, 2017

William Tuttle  William Tuttle, 1607-1673   departed Northampton England to sail on the “Planter” to arrive in Boston 1635.  He was accompanied by his wife Elizabeth and 3 children.  Later he settled in New Haven.

 

Mobility And Migration May 7, 2017

Filed under: Ancestors,Books,Genealogy,Great Migration Study,U.S. History — Janet @ 2:50 pm

IMG_3115   This is the latest addition to my genealogy research library.  It arrived in the post yesterday.  All the information about some of my immigrant ancestors that I have been laboriously collecting from ancestry.com just might be here in this book.   My immigrant ancestors originated from various parts of England but my impression so far is that the bulk of them came from East Anglia.  The book was published in 1994.  The author, Roger Thompson, is retired as university reader in American history at the University of East Anglia.

Here’s the blurb from the back cover:

“During the 1630’s, more than 14,000 people sailed from Britain bound for New England, constituting what has come to be known as the Great Migration.  This book offers the most extensive study of these emigrants ever undertaken.  Focusing on 2,000 individuals who moved from the five counties of eastern England, it provides historians with important new findings on mobility, family life, kinship networks, and community cohesion.

Roger Thompson reveals the personal experiences and ancestral histories of the emigrants.  He follows them across the Atlantic and investigates their lives and achievements in the New World.  Distinguishing between such groups as gentry, entrepreneurs, artisans, farmers, and servants, he explores whether the migration tended to be a solitary uprooting from a stable and predictable world of familiar neighborhoods or simply a longer move among many relocations.

Thompson also sheds light on the issue of motivation:  Were these settlers pulled by the hope of eventual enrichment or of founding a purified society, or were they pushed by intolerance and persecution at home?  Did they see New England as a haven of escape or an opportunity to exploit?  Did New Englanders seek to replicate ‘English ways,’ preserving traditional culture and society, or did they embrace change and innovation?  Mobility and Migration provides a wealth of new evidence for historians of both early modern England and colonial America.”

There it is – has he said it all??

 

My Ancestor Myles Standish March 1, 2017

mum38qar_medium  Yes this is Myles Standish of Mayflower fame.  He is my  8th  Great Grandfather.

img_2524

Captain Myles Standish was an English military officer hired by the Pilgrims as military advisor for Plymouth Colony.  He was one of the passengers on the Mayflower.

Myles Standish was not a Pilgrim but it was in his capacity as a military man that he was in the Low Countries to help the Dutch in their war against Spain.  And it was in Leyden in Holland that he got to know the Pilgrims there.  It was through his acquaintance with the Pilgrim Pastor John Robinson that he came to be hired as their military captain to command and train their militia.  Thus Myles and his first wife Rose were among the passengers, the original settlers,  on the Mayflower.

After the Mayflower made landfall on the tip of Cape Cod in late October 1620, he led most of the exploratory missions looking for a place to settle.  Many of the settlers who arrived in the Mayflower were weakened and ill after their voyage across the Atlantic.  Sadly, Myles wife Rose was among those who did not survive those early months.  She died in late January 1621.

Myles remarried in 1623.  His 2nd wife, Barbara, arrived on the ship “Anne” in July 1623.  Myles and Barbara had 6 children, 4of whom survived infancy.  The most important of whom from my standpoint was their surviving son Josiah, who became my 7th Great Grandfather.

 

 

Church of Saint Nicholas Great Yarmouth Norfolk England January 29, 2017

church-of-st-nicholas-great-yarmouth

Back to my genealogy research.  This church was the place of worship for my 8X Great Grandmother Susanna Felton.  Susanna left Norfolk to come to Salem Massachusetts in the 1630’s.  She was part of The Great Migration.

st-nicholas-church-gt-yarmouth