Janet's thread

A weblog, mostly about knitting but other topics appear

The Puzzle Revisited January 11, 2018

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Progress has been made on the lower part of the puzzle but I’m really struggling with the upper part.  Please note the missing piece on the right of the puzzle.  THE CAT is the villain.

Meanwhile it’s still raining outside.  Rain, rain, rain.  I think I prefer it to the icy conditions recently experienced on the East Coast.  I was particularly struck by the pictures of  ice and snow in Perkins Cove in Ogunquit Maine.

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Interested In Maine History? July 4, 2017

IMG_3646  Here’s the book for all history enthusiasts.  In a book store in Mystic Connecticut, I found this book about the history of Maine – titled The Lobster Coast, Rebels, Rusticators, and the Struggle for a Forgotten Frontier, by Colin Woodard.  As one would expect, there’s quite a bit of detail about fish and the fishing industry, particularly  lobsters.  But there is also a lot to make one think about the rights of Native Americans and the rights and relationships between the original settlers and the subsequent waves of  “newcomers”, right up to the present day transformations of land use and the questions of distribution of wealth.

In my genealogy research I have been able to trace most of my ancestors back many generations.  At present I am trying to concentrate/focus on the immigration experiences of these branches in my family tree.  These would be the 6th-9th great grandparents.  About 90% of these forebears came to New England.  I have one case of an abrupt end of the trail with my 3rd great grandparents Joseph Reed and Sarah Maddox.  They were each born in Maine in the late 1700’s.  Joseph died in Maine in 1850.  Their daughter Abigail was my great great grandmother.  She was born in Gloucester in 1804.  But I do not have any information re Joseph and Sarah’s forebears, my 4th great grandparents etc.  Did they come to Maine as immigrants?  What happened to them in this remote and harsh part of the American frontier.  Did they perish in an encounter with one of the many tribes of Native Americans who raided the settlers villages and isolated dwellings.   I wonder.

 

A Day In Essex (Connecticut) June 24, 2017

Could this be a view along the Connecticut River?

We had a wonderful day in Essex Connecticut, a lovely town on the Connecticut River. Lunching at Marlay’s at the marina in Essex.  Son David had a great time maneuvering my husband’s wheelchair onto the 6 person ferry which took us to Marlay’s on the island.

Essex is such a gem of a town.  After lunch we had a bit of time to shop but it was so hot along the main street, we didn’t linger long to examine all the colorful plants and blossoms in the gardens and the classic beauty of the historic houses.  Another time.

 

My Ancestor Myles Standish March 1, 2017

mum38qar_medium  Yes this is Myles Standish of Mayflower fame.  He is my  8th  Great Grandfather.

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Captain Myles Standish was an English military officer hired by the Pilgrims as military advisor for Plymouth Colony.  He was one of the passengers on the Mayflower.

Myles Standish was not a Pilgrim but it was in his capacity as a military man that he was in the Low Countries to help the Dutch in their war against Spain.  And it was in Leyden in Holland that he got to know the Pilgrims there.  It was through his acquaintance with the Pilgrim Pastor John Robinson that he came to be hired as their military captain to command and train their militia.  Thus Myles and his first wife Rose were among the passengers, the original settlers,  on the Mayflower.

After the Mayflower made landfall on the tip of Cape Cod in late October 1620, he led most of the exploratory missions looking for a place to settle.  Many of the settlers who arrived in the Mayflower were weakened and ill after their voyage across the Atlantic.  Sadly, Myles wife Rose was among those who did not survive those early months.  She died in late January 1621.

Myles remarried in 1623.  His 2nd wife, Barbara, arrived on the ship “Anne” in July 1623.  Myles and Barbara had 6 children, 4of whom survived infancy.  The most important of whom from my standpoint was their surviving son Josiah, who became my 7th Great Grandfather.

 

 

Essex County Massachusetts 1643 January 6, 2017

Filed under: Early Immigrants,Early Settlers,Maps,New England — Janet @ 5:00 am

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A number of my ancestors were early settlers in this area of New England north of Boston.

 

Genealogy Route From John Hollister, Builder of the Oldest House in Glastonbury Connecticut, My 9th Great Grandfather December 16, 2016

The oldest house in Glastonbury Connecticut, built by Lt. John Hollister

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My 9th Great Grandfather Lt. John Hollister 1612-1665

My 8th Great Grandmother  Mary Hollister 1650-1713

My 7th Great Grandfather  Capt. John Welles 1676-1735

My 6th Great Grandmother  Phebe Welles  1707-1770

My 5th Great Grandmother  Sarah Ufford 1728-1804

My 4th Great Grandfather Stiles Curtiss 1761-1827

My 3rd Great Grandmother Betsey Curtiss Wooton 1791-1877

My 2nd Great Grandfather Henry W. Warner 1815-1859

My Great Grandmother Lucy Anna Warner 1843-1878

My Grandmother Mary Elizabeth Murdoch 1863-1954

My father Joseph Buckingham Miller 1891-1949

Me Janet Willis Miller 1936-

 

Distant Ancestor July 30, 2016

Robert Keyes – early immigrant – one of the founders of Watertown MassachusettsWatertown Founders Robert Keyes

Watertown is adjacent to my hometown of Belmont.

Photo below: Cemetery associated with Robert Keyes

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Gravestone Moss May 21, 2016

gravestone moss  john priest  I’m not sure how you could identify this gravestone in Lancaster Massachusetts as marking the burial place for John Priest, my 7X Great Grandfather.  The grave marker dates from the early 1700’s.  Think of the weathering due to 300 years of New England seasons.  There is a certain visual and symbolic beauty to the stone.

 

A Knapsack April 1, 2016

This is a diversion from my current focus in my genealogy research.  This is the knapsack carried by my 4X Great Grandfather Benjamin Warner in the Revolutionary War.

benjamin warner's knapsack

 

Following The Pilgrims January 31, 2016

pilgrims image                  pilgrims_film_landing-date  What a marvelous program we saw last night.  One of the best.  It was a PBS DVD from the American Experience series.  Most of the broad outline was familiar but this film portrayed it so well that it is now more firmly fixed in my mind (I hope!)  And I learned a lot as well.  Furthermore it tied in well with my genealogy research.

?Did you know that one of the men on the Mayflower was swept overboard but miraculously was rescued and went on to survive the first harsh winter etc and father 10 children.  He had 88 grandchildren, more than 500 great grandchildren and his subsequent descendants number in the tens of thousands – including Humphrey Bogart, Bob Hope, and both Bush Presidents.  I wonder if I can find myself among the millions of descendants living today.  The search goes on.