Janet's thread

A weblog, mostly about knitting but other topics appear

Images of Weaving December 29, 2017

Filed under: Weavers,Weaving,Weaving looms — Janet @ 8:02 pm

2017_07_08_15_53_09.pdf000  a younger me in Suva Fiji 1973 – early days learning to weave and demonstrating same on a table loom

WeavingPic

CottonLoopRugWeaving

close-up-of-janet-at-loom-april-04  at my Glimakra loom in Dublin

 

 

Start Your Day……. March 24, 2017

17342655_774545312711136_7201039594426454023_n  Start your day with this beautiful photo of Spring in Ireland – a contrast of green and yellow – thanks to Sarah Rubalcava of Rubalcava Horticultural Services.

Sarah’s mom (and my friend) Magda Rubalcava is an award winning internationally renown tapestry weaver – wouldn’t this make a spectacular tapestry?

 

Regrets July 12, 2016

I haven’t played my recorders for a couple of years or so.  I was just busy with other activities and the time and place where the monthly recorder meetings were held were no longer convenient.  But recently I tried playing the recorder again and found that arthritis in my hands made it difficult to play.  Alas.  Up until now the things associated with aging haven’t really bothered me.  But now, trying to play the recorder is painful and it is bothering me to find that I just can’t spread my fingers with enough agility to make playing the recorder possible.  I really wanted to attend and play in an up coming one day jazz workshop.miscellaneous-ian-009  In younger days with the bass recorder.  7 or 8 years ago?  in my early 70’s

I have a friend of similar vintage whose mother had very bad arthritis in her hands.  My friend is taking piano lessons to hopefully ward off similar problems.

Come to think of it, my own mother also had bad arthritis in her hands in later years.   She was an avid knitter, as am I.  When she moved to Hawaii, knitting was no longer so important in her life.  So I don’t know if she could have continued to knit if she had wanted to.  Knitting is still important to but I could substitute other fiber activities just as satisfying.  After all, my abandonment of weaving has been partially age related and I don’t really miss it – I can still maintain my interest without physically crawling under that big Glimakra loom.

yamaha-and-kung-recorders.jpg

close-up-of-janet-at-loom-april-04

 

 

 

Do I Really Have An Ancestor Who Went To Western Australia? June 15, 2016

Agnes Warburton my 9X GGM was born in England in 1580 and died in Western Australia in 1675.  I never heard of this person before today – thanks to Ancestry.com

Now I’ll try to track down another possible ancestor – Robert Buckingham, a Silk Weaver, born in England in 1571 and lived in Norfolk England.  He died in 1633, age 62

 

A Weaver Ancestor May 4, 2016

My 7X Great Grandfather, who served in King Philip’s War, was a farmer and a weaver.  Hooray.  A kindred soul.  Lots of my ancestors were knitters, but this is the first weaver I have found.

  Me at my loom in Bhutan

 

Weaving In Wood April 2, 2016

Filed under: Carving,Weavers,Weaving,Weaving looms — Janet @ 1:36 pm

weaver carving Unusual carving

 

Vincent Van Gogh March 31, 2016

Happy Birthday Vincent Van Gogh.  vincent van gogh

weaver at loom a postcard of a painting in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890), Wever en weefstoel, 1884, The loom
In London one time we were visiting one of the sons and we were wandering around in the Antiques Market in Chelsea. I saw a painting which reminded me of this one. I dithered about buying it – 100 pounds seemed like a lot and besides how could we get the painting back to Dublin. Alas, I didn’t buy it and I’m sure you can tell that I have regretted that ever since.

 

Woven Towels March 24, 2016

Filed under: Weavers,Weaving — Janet @ 2:25 pm

woven towels   These woven towels by a member of the Seattle Weavers Guild are so beautiful.  The member who wove them is the speaker today at the Guild’s monthly meeting.  Wish I could attend.

 

17 Swedish Designers June 4, 2011

   17 Swedish Designers, all women, touring in the U.S.   This is an exhibition of current industrial design ideas as pursued by 17 Swedish women.  Ceramics, furniture, and textiles, design for everyday use.  In black and white with a lot of bright accents.  This morning I went to a the Nordic Heritage Museum to see the exhibition and hear a talk given by one of the designers, Lotta Kuhlhorn.  Lotta is a graphic designer.  She has quite a range of work, all of which I liked – book covers, designs for kitchenware, designs for textiles.  She has her own firm,  Koloni Stockholm, along with being a designer for IKEA.  Her work, and that of others in the show, made me think of William Morris, Marimekko, and Cath Kidston.  She really likes the styles from the 1960’s – and that made many in the audience feel right at home!  I liked the colourful dress she was wearing – when asked if she had designed it, she replied “no, I found it in a flea market in Stockholm only last week”.  That is just so neat – to be a distinguished visitor giving a talk about a major exhibition and wearing a dress she found in a flea market.  My type of person!!

Here’s another website I found showing some of her work.  I think it’s fabulous. 

The exhibition was spread out over 3 rooms in the museum.  Items very neatly displayed on temporary flooring/platforms.  I was a bit disappointed not to see more in the way of textiles but then that’s my particular interest.  The exhibition as a whole was wonderful.   And here are a few of my photos from this morning.

  these knitted textiles were the work of Ulrika Martensson.

  very strong but in a way muted statements in rugs and cushions

  this photo doesn’t do justice to Lotta Kuhlhorn’s work but I want to include it anyhow

  an IKEA chair and cushion – I am a great fan of IKEA and in fact the chair I am sitting on as I type this is an IKEA chair which I bought for the sheer love of the design.

  some of the people there this morning – you can’t quite see Lotta live but she is in the mural – 2nd from the right

  Lotta live, in the patterned dress with a beige sweater – in the discussion earlier one of the questions was about a favourite colour – Lotta wasn’t sure but did say that one technique she used for getting to like a colour was to wear it for a while.  So here she is wearing beige which she doesn’t like very much but has plans to use it.  I really like her approach!

Another humourous thing that happened this morning was early on in the slide show when Lotta was starting to talk about her work.  She showed a couple of slides of her allotment in Stockholm.  Allotment was a strange word to this Seattle audience.  It was finally sorted out that allotments here in Seattle are called “pea patches”.  I like allotment better.

It was a coincidence this morning that I had a couple of emails about a big exhibition that is opening tomorrow in Kilkenny in Ireland.  An exhibition of work by leading tapestry weavers – all old friends.  Wish I could be there.

 

Another Book Store April 22, 2011

Filed under: Book stores,History,U. S. History,U.S. Civil War,Weavers,Weaving — Janet @ 10:46 pm

I didn’t get a photo of another book store that we went to in Scottsdale, but in our wandering the streets of Old Scottsdale we spotted a big sign which directed us to Guidon Books, a few blocks away.  They had recently moved  so we emerged from the shade, crossed several very wide streets and walked several blocks.  It was hot.  The heat was just shimmering up off the pavement in mid-afternoon.  But Guidon Books was well worth the trek – for me at least.  I don’t think the rest of the family was quite so interested.  I found some Civil War replica postcards which I quite liked – and I found a book on tapestry weaving.  And a brochure about the Arizona History Convention to be held very soon – too late to attend this year but the list of papers to be given looks very interesting.  Next year, 2012, will be Arizona’s centenary.  It is just amazing to me that Arizona only became a state, the 48th, 100 years ago, the year my mother was born.  I feel a part of living history!

  Guidon Books – they have moved a few blocks to a nicely shaded building, many interconnecting rooms, but we only browsed the Civil War area.  Further afield, I think, were the Western Americana books that I really wanted to see.  Hope there will be a next time.  This was really just a reconnaissance.

   a replica Civil War postcard – a  scene from the Gettysburg Cyclorama.  Hospital Scene.  A surgeon amputates the leg of a wounded man in the shed on the right.

   brochure for the upcoming Arizona History Convention.  I was told that Guidon Books will have a stall.

  my book purchase – a new book about tapestry weaving.