Janet’s thread

A weblog, mostly about knitting but other topics appear

Mobility And Migration May 7, 2017

Filed under: Ancestors,Books,Genealogy,Great Migration Study,U.S. History — Janet @ 2:50 pm

IMG_3115   This is the latest addition to my genealogy research library.  It arrived in the post yesterday.  All the information about some of my immigrant ancestors that I have been laboriously collecting from ancestry.com just might be here in this book.   My immigrant ancestors originated from various parts of England but my impression so far is that the bulk of them came from East Anglia.  The book was published in 1994.  The author, Roger Thompson, is retired as university reader in American history at the University of East Anglia.

Here’s the blurb from the back cover:

“During the 1630’s, more than 14,000 people sailed from Britain bound for New England, constituting what has come to be known as the Great Migration.  This book offers the most extensive study of these emigrants ever undertaken.  Focusing on 2,000 individuals who moved from the five counties of eastern England, it provides historians with important new findings on mobility, family life, kinship networks, and community cohesion.

Roger Thompson reveals the personal experiences and ancestral histories of the emigrants.  He follows them across the Atlantic and investigates their lives and achievements in the New World.  Distinguishing between such groups as gentry, entrepreneurs, artisans, farmers, and servants, he explores whether the migration tended to be a solitary uprooting from a stable and predictable world of familiar neighborhoods or simply a longer move among many relocations.

Thompson also sheds light on the issue of motivation:  Were these settlers pulled by the hope of eventual enrichment or of founding a purified society, or were they pushed by intolerance and persecution at home?  Did they see New England as a haven of escape or an opportunity to exploit?  Did New Englanders seek to replicate ‘English ways,’ preserving traditional culture and society, or did they embrace change and innovation?  Mobility and Migration provides a wealth of new evidence for historians of both early modern England and colonial America.”

There it is – has he said it all??

 

Owen Tudor, Grandfather of King Henry VII of England May 6, 2017

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 4:48 pm

The Freelance History Writer

Owen Tudor was born c. 1400. His father was Maredudd ap Tudur ap Goronwy and his mother was Margaret, daughter of Dafydd Fychan. Through his father, Owen was a descendant of Ednyfed Fychan who was a major landowner in the area of Penmynydd in Anglesey. Fychan had been a prominent servant of the princes of Gwyndedd. Through marriage, Owen was a cousin of Owain Glyn Dŵr, the Welsh prince who rebelled against the kings of England. The Tudors were a part of a movement by the princes of Wales to unify the country into its own principality.

Little is known of Owen’s early life but his family played a key role in the Welsh uprising and fought on Glyn Dŵr’s side. After the rebellion was suppressed, many Welshmen came into the service of the English kings, including Owen’s relatives. Most likely this is how he made his way to the…

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Fremont and Seattle’s Ship Canal May 5, 2017

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 2:44 pm

Wedgwood in Seattle History

Fremont was a successful early community because of its advantageous location at one corner of Lake Union.

Seattle’s earliest white settlers saw immediately that it would be possible to connect its freshwater lakes to the saltwater Puget Sound by means of a canal.  At a Fourth of July picnic in 1954, Thomas Mercer proposed the name of Lake Union because that body of water was in the middle between Lake Washington to the east, and Puget Sound to the west.  Thomas Mercer and David Denny took land claims at the south end of Lake Union.  Two single men, John Ross and William Strickler, searched out the land and in 1855 they took claims at the northwest corner of Lake Union, which today is the Fremont neighborhood.

From those early times Seattle settlers thought to build a ship canal but little did they know that it would take more than…

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A Big Black Bird On My Deck May 4, 2017

Filed under: Apple Blossoms,Bird Identification,Birds,Crows,Ravens — Janet @ 3:21 pm

IMG_3100             IMG_3102

It’s misty this morning but the crow or raven is clearly visible!  Kind of scary.

IMG_3098  view from another window – the apple blossoms are just lovely

IMG_3099

 

As Spain Welcomes Back Jews Expelled in the 1400’s, I Share my Spanish Roots

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 3:06 pm

zicharonot

“Grandpa’s family was originally from Spain,” my Grandma Thelma would begin her story with these words. “They left Spain because they did not want to convert. They were court Jews and could have stayed. But their Judaism was more important.”

I thought this was a ‘bubba meiser,’ just a myth and a bedtime story. And for many years, I did not believe the Spanish expulsion of Jews had anything to do with me. I thought it was enough that our family had been decimated by the Shoah. But it seems my grandmother was telling me the truth, and my family is both a survivor of the Spanish and German attempts to destroy the Jewish people.
Grandpa Nat portrait

My Grandpa Nat’s last name was Amsterdam. This is a somewhat unusual Jewish name. And, it seems, actually anyone named Amsterdam is related to me. The family started in Spain as wealthy Jewish merchants and…

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A Work Of Art

Filed under: Ancestors,Ancestry,Art works,Artists,Coat of Arms,Genealogy — Janet @ 2:03 pm

Blundell COA  the Blundell Coat of Arms

 

More About The Nine Generations Chart May 3, 2017

IMG_3073

 

In reality my 9 Generations Chart has a few gaps in the tree, starting with Generation 7 where there are 10 ancestors missing.

Generation 7 should have 64 ancestors   but there are only 54 identified

 

Generation 1 – Me

Generation 2 – My Parents

Generation 3 – My Grandparents   4 people

Generation 4 – My Great Grandparents  8 people

Generation 5 – My Great Great Grandparents  16 people

Generation 6 – My 3X Great Grandparents  32 people

Generation 7 – My 4X Great Grandparents   64 people

Generation 8 – My 5X Great Grandparents   128 people

Generation 9 – My 6X Great Grandparents   256 people

Ideally there should be 511 people on the tree

I searched again for the missing parents of Agnes Lee.  Agnes Lee is in Generation 6. No luck in finding her missing parents in Generation 7.  So that means I’m also missing her 4 grandparents and 8 great grandparents in generations 8 and 9.  Things compound rapidly.