Janet's thread

A weblog, mostly about knitting but other topics appear

The Survivors: Mitsubishi J2M Raiden – The Last Japanese Thunderbolt March 18, 2018

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 3:05 am

Aces Flying High

One of the better fighter designs operated by the Imperial Japanese Navy in World War Two but not built in enough numbers, was the Mitsubishi J2M Raiden (“Thunderbolt” – Allied Code Name: Jack) land based interceptor used to attack Allied bombers such as the USAAF Boeing B-29 Superfortress. It was designed to be fast with a top speed 596km/h (370 mph – examples captured and tested by the United States using 92 octane fuel plus methanol, flew at speeds between 655km/h and 671km/h!), with an excellent rate of climb, to quickly reach the enemy bombers at altitude and later variants packed a punch with 4 x 20mm Type 99 wing mounted cannons to bring them down. It was armoured but maneuverability was sacrificed for speed and this pilot protection. Unfortunately performance at high altitude was hampered by the lack of an engine turbocharger on the main production Raiden aircraft.

Mitsubishi J2M1 Raiden prototype - the three J2M1 Raiden prototypes flew for the first time on March 20th, 1942 Mitsubishi…

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Happy St Patrick’s Day March 17, 2018

Filed under: Cats,Ireland,Katerina,St. Patrick's Day — Janet @ 9:49 pm

st patrick's day cat  from Katerina

credit to Linda Arthur Tejura



Rose Valland – Art Spy Extraordinaire

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 3:18 pm

A Scholarly Skater

As all of you probably know, the topic of art crime is very important to me. Art matters to me, so people who threaten it bother me deeply. Thus far, I’ve written about forgery, the theft and repatriation of art during World War Two, the work of The Monuments Men, and destruction of cultural heritage currently taking place in the Middle East. However, I have not yet written about an extremely courageous woman who was instrumental in tracking and restoring thousands of works stolen by the Nazis from France during World War Two. Her impact on western cultural heritage was immense, so I think it’s about time she gets some space on this blog.

Rose Valland (1898-1980) was one of the war’s unlikeliest of heroes. A country-born French woman who studied art and art history at several prestigious institutions including the Sorbonne, Valland was a volunteer curator at the Louvre when Paris…

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More Royal Connections March 16, 2018

Filed under: Ancestors,Ancestry,Genealogy — Janet @ 7:00 pm

My 14th Great Grandfather Sir George Anthony St Leger, 1484-1536.   The following is from Geni:

Inherited Lundy Eggesford, Annery, Monkleigh in Devon and other properties in Kent and Sussex from his maternal grandfather the Earl of Ormond. A chief courtier to King Henry VIII, his wife was Lady in waiting to Catalina of Aragon and they both attended the “Field of the Cloth of Gold” in France. They also attended the coronation of Anne Boleyn, his cousin on 29 May 1533 in Westminster Abbey. His son was awarded many lands in Devon in Exchange for Kent property owned by his grandmother. “Served” at Exeter Cathedral.

His wife was Lady Anne Bourchier Knyvett

And for One of his sons, the brother of Catherine St Leger, my 13th Great Grandmother         the following information Extracted from Wikipedia:

He was the son of Sir George St Leger (c.1475-1536), of Annery, by his wife, Anne Knyvett, daughter of Sir Edmund Knyvett of Buckenham[2] and his wife Eleanor Tyrrell. His paternal grandparents were Sir James St Leger, of Shipton, and Lady Anne Butler, heiress of Annery, daughter of Thomas Butler, 7th Earl of Ormonde[citation needed] and great-aunt of Queen Anne Boleyn. One of his great-uncles was Sir Thomas St Leger (c.1440-1483), the husband of Anne of York, Duchess of Exeter (1439-1476), sister of Kings Edward IV and Richard III. His great-grandfather was Sir John St Leger (c.1404-1442) lord of the manor of Ulcombe in Kent, whose three sons Ralph, Thomas and James, all made advantageous marriages. The manor of Ulcombe had been held by the family from the See of Canterbury from shortly after the Norman Conquest of 1066, during which a St Leger knight is supposed by tradition to have supported William the Conqueror with his hand on disembarking from his ship at Pevensey.[3]


Royal Connections

Filed under: Ancestors,Ancestry,Manor Houses — Janet @ 6:09 pm

Nicholas Gainsford was my 16th Great Grandfather – here’s what Wikipedia has to say about him:

Nicholas Gainsford, also written Gaynesford or Gaynesforde, (about 1427–1498) of Carshalton, Surrey, of an armigerous gentry family established at Crowhurst, was a Justice of the Peace, several times Member of Parliament and High Sheriff of Surrey and Sussex, Constable and Keeper of Odiham Castle and Park, Hampshire, who served in the royal households from around 1461 until his death in 1498. Rising to high office during the reign of Henry VI, he was an Usher to the Chamber of Edward IV and, by 1476, to his queen Elizabeth Woodville. Closely within the sphere of Woodville patronage, he was a favourer of Edward V, and was a leader in the Kentish rising of 1483 against Richard III. He was attainted in 1483, but was soon afterwards pardoned, and fully regained his position and estate as Esquire to Henry VII and Elizabeth of York after the Battle of Bosworth Field. He established the Carshalton branch of the Gainsford family.

Crowhurst-Place-Geograph-2978142-by-Carl-Ayling  photo from Wikipedia – Crowhurst setting – the structure shown in this photo has been altered from the original Crowhurst manor house




Hopper Puzzle ALMOST Finished March 15, 2018

Filed under: Art,Art works,Edward Hopper,Jigsaw Puzzles — Janet @ 4:51 pm

IMG_5409  that last piece doesn’t fit!!  also there is some juggling to do with the 2 edge pieces

the all black section took a long time and much juggling of the pieces

Later in the day –   IMG_5412  FINISHED


My distant relative, the minor Victorian novelist March 13, 2018

Filed under: Uncategorized — Janet @ 8:42 pm

Past Lives

It’s always gratifying when my amateur, part-time family history research is found useful by professional researchers. For example, I was pleased to find this blog linked to by the excellent Legacies of British Slave-ownership project, run by a research team at University College London, and by a site about the authorship of Shakespeare’s plays. It was also nice when a ‘proper’ historian tweeted a link to something I’d written about my ancestors, citing it as a good example of ‘microhistory’. And I like it when I’m approached by postgraduate researchers seeking help with tracing the subjects of their study. Some time ago, I was contacted by a PhD student exploring the work of a minor sixteenth-century poet with links to one of the Sussex families I’d been researching. Then, a few weeks ago, I had an email from Katherine Mansfield, a postgraduate student (with a wonderfully appropriate name) investigating…

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